Historic SF parsonage-turned-home for sale for the first time in 100 years


A former San Francisco parsonage turned residence is now for sale for the first time in over 100 years, asking $4.2 million.

Mario Serafin

San Francisco’s Swedenborgian Church was established in 1895, an iconic structure from its inception. The parsonage next door at 2121 Lyon Street was created by the same architects, though it was later separated from the church property and transformed into a private residence. That home is now for sale for the first time in over 100 years, asking $4.2 million.

One of California’s earliest examples of the Arts and Crafts movement, the two buildings reflect the influence of several important turn-of-the-20th-century thinkers and creators, including architect A. Page Brown, who is credited with the design of the San Francisco Ferry Building, and artist William Keith, whose 6-by-10-foot panoramas of California landscapes were once owned by Gov. Leland Stanford and now hang in the Oakland Museum of California as well as the Mission Inn in Riverside.

A former San Francisco parsonage turned residence is now for sale for the first time in over 100 years, asking $4.2 million.

Mario Serafin

These talents worked with Reverend Joseph Worcester, the first pastor of the San Francisco Swedenborgian Church. Worcester was himself an amateur architect whose First Bay Tradition style was developed and popularized by Bernard Maybeck, Willis Polk and Julia Morgan, among others. Both the church and parsonage were both designed in the First Bay Tradition aesthetic. The church was designated a National Historic Landmark in 2004.

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A former San Francisco parsonage turned residence is now for sale for the first time in over 100 years, asking $4.2 million.

Mario Serafin

The parsonage remained in the hands of the church for just five years. In 1900, Keith purchased 2121 Lyon, which began its history as a private residence. Twenty-one years later, the property was purchased by the Eloesser family, who lived in the home until 1986. Dr. Leo Eloesser was a San Francisco thoracic surgeon, wartime volunteer, faculty member of the Stanford Medical School and pioneer of the “Eloesser flap” surgical procedure. From the Eloesser family, 212 Lyon returned to the Swedenborgian Church through a life estate deed.

A former San Francisco parsonage turned residence is now for sale for the first time in over 100 years, asking $4.2 million.

Mario Serafin

The house today offers five bedrooms and three and a half bathrooms inside 4,010 square feet. The Craftsman details that distinguish its original design are still present in the molding, built-ins, fireplaces and hearths as well as the delicate staircase rising from the grand entry. These vintage details combine with modern additions added over the home’s long life. “Despite its 129 years of age, this home feels very modern,” Compass listing agent Kerry Rose wrote SFGATE in an email. “The light, ample room sizes, high ceilings, layout and exquisite details make this home an amazing hybrid of classic and modern styles.” 

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A former San Francisco parsonage turned residence is now for sale for the first time in over 100 years, asking $4.2 million.

Mario Serafin

To achieve that hybrid of classic and modern, the home we see today has been renovated extensively, and exceedingly carefully. In 2011, the Architectural Resources Group, a conservation and preservationist group, produced a historic structures report that guided the home’s remodeling. The project included both structural and aesthetic upgrades, resulting in a modern kitchen and bathrooms, and new interior systems, as well as the repair and restoration of the home’s exterior. Additional updates were made to the home in 2023 to prepare it for listing.

A former San Francisco parsonage turned residence is now for sale for the first time in over 100 years, asking $4.2 million.

Mario Serafin

A former San Francisco parsonage turned residence is now for sale for the first time in over 100 years, asking $4.2 million.

Mario Serafin

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This article was originally published by a www.sfgate.com . Read the Original article here. .